Cobalt Chromium Toxicity

Depuy ASR Hip Recall Update

DePuy Hip Recall Tweets about Pinnacle Hip Help Website


Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants and Revision Surgery


Patients undergo hip replacement surgery in order to improve their quality of life. Hip replacement surgery is supposed to increase activity levels, improve range of motion, and ease pain and suffering. Unfortunately, after their index (initial) surgeries, individuals soon find their hip replacement is hindering rather than helping. This is often the case with metal-on-metal hip replacements.

Metal-on-metal hip systems such as the DePuy PinnacleDePuy ASRStryker Rejuvenate, Stryker ABG IIStryker AccoladeWright Pro Femur and Wright Conserve, have the highest failure rate compared to any other hip implant. Most individuals experience serious complications and subsequent failure with these implants. Complications from metal-on-metal hips include cobalt-chromium toxicity, metallosis, pseudotumors, infection, loosening and implant wear, joint stiffness, and fracture. These complications cause implant failure. Implant failure requires a second surgery, known as a revision surgery. A revision surgery requires removing the failed implant(s) and replacing with a new device.

Revision surgery is more complex and risky than the index surgery because it is more invasive. Therefore, the risk of complications is greater with a revision surgery than initial surgery. The implants are more likely to loosen, migrate, and fracture since the bone and hip joint are severely manipulated from the previous implant.

Hip Surgery: The Importance of Doctor-Patient Communication


An open and honest dialogue with your doctor before surgery contributes to better outcomes. This means providing your physician with a comprehensive medical, surgical, and social history. This also ensures the doctor gives you the best care in creating a plan that fits your specific needs. Before any surgery, it is essential to voice any questions or concerns you might have.

The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) created a list of questions which may help in discussions with your doctor:

  • What are your experiences with specific hip implant devices and how often do you use one over the other?
  • What are the risks and benefits of different devices (metal-on-metal, metal-on-polyethylene, ceramic-on-polyethylene, and ceramic-on-ceramic devices)?
  • If applicable, what is the surgeon’s personal experience and outcomes with the respective devices?
  • If your surgeon recommends a certain device, ask why that hip implant is the best for your situation.
  • What are the major and/or most frequent complications of surgery?
  • Is the skill and experience of the orthopaedic surgeon more important than the device or procedure?
  • Can you give me any information on outcomes and complication rates?
  • If I do not have surgery, what is the risk?
  • How much pain can I expect, and how will it be managed in the hospital and after I go home?
  • How long will the device last, and what can I do to make it last as long as possible?
  • What are the pros and cons of minimally invasive (mini-incision) surgery? Does it really make a meaningful difference in the result, or does it pose unnecessary risks?
  • What will I be able to do/not do after my total joint replacement?
  • Is therapy necessary after surgery?
  • How long will I be in the hospital?
  • Will I be able to contact you after the surgery if I have a question or problem?

What should I do if I have a metal on metal hip?


A series of product recalls involving prosthetic hips occurred recently. The design of these hips led to the release of toxic levels of cobalt and chromium (the metal the hips are made of) into the patients who receive them.  These metals cause extensive tissue damage in the hip and other areas of the body. This usually requires additional surgery to repair. Kershaw, Cook & Talley currently handles cases involving the following types of hips: DePuy PinnacleDePuy ASRStryker AccoladeStryker Rejuvenate, Stryker ABG IIBiomet, and Wright Medical.

Many individuals are unsure what to do when they find out their metal on metal hip is defective or recalled. Kershaw, Cook & Talley recommends the following steps:

A) Find out what name and model hip you have. There are various ways to do this:

  1. Contact your orthopedic surgeon by phone. 
  2. Request a copy of your medical records in writing from the orthopedic surgeon’s office or hospital where the surgery was performed. 
  3. Check your implant card. Often times, after surgery, your doctor gives you an implant card which states the hip name and type. 


B) Check to see if your hip implant was officially recalled (if not, you may still have a case).

  1. You might have received a recall letter notifying you that your hip implant was recalled. 
  2. If you did not receive a letter, ask your doctor if your hip implant was recalled. 


C) Have your blood tested for cobalt and chromium:

  1. Tell your doctor you want to get your blood tested specifically for cobalt and chromium. 


D) Get a MARS MRI:

  1. MARS MRI stands for Metal Artifact Reduction Sequence MRIA MARS MRI is an imaging technique which minimizes metal artifact (i.e. parts of the implant) while maintaining image quality.
  2. You will most likely have to request this imaging study from your orthopedic surgeon. 

F) Call our office for a free case consultation and if you have any more questions regarding your metal-on-metal hip. 

Is your DePuy Pinnacle harming you?


People might think because the DePuy Pinnacle is not recalled it may not be harmful. This is false!  

The DePuy Pinnacle is a metal on metal hip replacement system: the ball and socket of the device are made of metal. Nowadays, the words “metal on metal” are enough to trigger a worried response from individuals implanted with these types of hips. And rightfully so.

With metal on metal implants, like the DePuy Pinnacle, the metal ball and metal socket rub against each other during activities. Metal is also released from implant parts where two components connect. Metal release results in metal ions to wear off the device causing damage to bone and soft tissue surrounding the implant and joint. This is known as an adverse local tissue reaction or adverse reaction to metal debris.

Adverse reaction to metal debris can cause pain, device failure, and implant loosening which may lead to needing a revision surgery. When metal ions are released into the bloodstream, it can precipitate a systemic reaction and cause other issues including skin rash, cardiomyopathy (a heart condition), neurological impairment, psychological changes, and thyroid abnormalities. The long term effects of exposure to these metal devices is unknown.

We highly recommend you speak to a doctor immediately if you have a DePuy Pinnacle whether or not you are experiencing the aforementioned symptoms. 

DePuy Pinnacle Trial Update: Week 6 10/6-10/9



We are providing an update on the ongoing DePuy Pinnacle trial now pending in federal court in Dallas, Texas. This is the very first case to be tried in front of a jury in the country. There are about 6,000 cases now pending against DePuy by people who were injured by their Pinnacle hips. We are now in the sixth week of the trial.

This week in the trial we continued with the defense case and the witnesses DePuy is putting on the stand. They introduced a series of expert witnesses to talk about all of the things DePuy did to test and get the Pinnacle hip approved by the FDA. The purpose of the testimony is to give jurors the impression that DePuy is a responsible company, and that they performed all the appropriate tests the FDA required, and really didn’t do anything wrong. There is a problem with that argument. The way the FDA works is unique. A lot of people believe when the FDA approves a product, they thoroughly investigated the product and decided that it’s a good product, it’s safe, and the warnings are adequate. The truth is something different. With medical devices, such as hips, manufacturers are not required to test the device. They can get approval from the FDA to sell the device with almost no testing at all if they show the device is substantially similar to another design that is already on the market. The issue with whether FDA approval means the device is safer, or the company did the right thing, really doesn’t mesh. So, when the FDA approves a device, they are not saying they tested it. The FDA doesn’t really test devices. The FDA relies on manufacturers to test the devices, and the manufacturers tell the FDA they tested the device. That’s when the FDA approves the device.

DePuy is trying to create the impression that because this was FDA approved it was a safe device and their testing was appropriate. In reality, this isn’t true.

The next phase of the trial will be the plaintiff’s rebuttal witnesses, present witnesses to rebut the arguments the defendants have made.

Broadspire and Hip Recalls


Stryker and Depuy hip manufacturers employ Broadspire, a third party claims administrator, to deal with individuals filing claims concerning their recalled prosthetic hips. Broadspire essentially functions like an insurance claims adjustor. They obtain information confirming people are implanted with recalled Stryker and Depuy hips. Subsequently, they decide the “appropriate” compensation for individuals who accrued out of pocket expenses secondary to their recalled hips.

According to the Depuy website, Broadspire will “address recall-related patient out-of-pocket expenses, such as co-pays, deductible expenses, lost wages, and travel costs.” However, Broadspire does not provide compensation for pain and suffering, or other problems, as a result of revision surgeries for your hip. They will not pay any impending medical expenses or lost wages you will incur. Unfortunately, adverse effects associated with recalled hips frequently arise in the future. Individuals may exhibit signs and symptoms from these adverse effects and require revision surgery in years to come. Broadspire has no legal or monetary obligation related to your pain and suffering.

Stryker and Depuy have no obligation to pay for anything once the statute of limitations expires on your case. The statute of limitations requires individuals claiming an injury from a product file a lawsuit within a certain period of time. Depending on the state, this time period is approximately one to two years. In addition, determining when and how someone is injured is subject to interpretation. Stryker and Depuy may claim you suspected an injury from your hip when you first learned about the recall. These dates were August 2010 (Depuy ASR) and June 2012 (Stryker Rejuvenate and ABG II). It is critical to file a lawsuit soon in order to protect yourself, and ensure you will receive medical compensation in the future.

Your health insurance company may partially cover your medical expenses. They have a right to reimbursement for your treatment regarding your injuries. If so, Broadspire does not reimburse the insurance company for any expenses they pay.  Hypothetically speaking, your insurance company pays $60,000 for your revision surgery. Broadspire pays you a $60,000 settlement. The health insurance company can collect the entire $60,000 settlement you receive from your Stryker or Depuy case, leaving you with nothing. This is something to consider before settling your case directly with Broadspire. We highly encourage consulting an attorney prior to dealing with Broadspire.

Broadspire works for the hip manufacturers. At Kershaw, Cook & Talley, we work on your behalf.

DePUY ASR SETTLEMENT UPDATE


    DePUY ASR SETTLEMENT UPDATE

November 19, 2013 – Today in Toledo Ohio, DePuy Orthopedics announced that it was initiating a voluntary settlement program in an effort to resolve approximately 8,000 lawsuits filed against it arising from the recall of its DePuy ASR prosthetic hip.  Under the program, individuals who have had a revision surgery of their DePuy ASR hip prior to August 31, 2013 will receive a “base award” of $250,000 to settle their claims against DePuy.  That base offer can then be adjusted downward for a variety of health factors including the age of the plaintiff,  the plaintiff’s smoking history, the plaintiff’s weight, and the length of time the implant was present before it was removed.

Under the program, there is also separate fund available to provide adjustments upward for individuals who had two revision surgeries or complications following their revision surgery.  The extent of upward adjustments is extremely complicated and is based on a variety of individual factors.

If you have not had your ASR hip revised, the settlement does not impact or affect your rights in any way.  The unrevised cases will continue to go forward and we expect that sometime down the road, DePuy will be forced to either settle these cases or submit them to a jury.

We want everyone to know that this is not the “official” DePuy ASR settlement website and the information provided here is for informational purposes only.  The official website containing information about the settlement can be found at www.USASRHipSettlement.com.  We encourage everyone to visit this website for more detailed information about the settlement.

Answers to some common questions that have been raised by our clients about this settlement can be found at:

www.defectivehipsettlementcenter.com

If you have any questions about the potential ASR and J&J settlement, contact our attorneys who specialize in defective hip cases who are available 24-hours a day. Call 888-635-3970 to speak with a Prodcut Liability Lawyer.

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