Cobalt Chromium Toxicity

Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants and Revision Surgery


Patients undergo hip replacement surgery in order to improve their quality of life. Hip replacement surgery is supposed to increase activity levels, improve range of motion, and ease pain and suffering. Unfortunately, after their index (initial) surgeries, individuals soon find their hip replacement is hindering rather than helping. This is often the case with metal-on-metal hip replacements.

Metal-on-metal hip systems such as the DePuy PinnacleDePuy ASRStryker Rejuvenate, Stryker ABG IIStryker AccoladeWright Pro Femur and Wright Conserve, have the highest failure rate compared to any other hip implant. Most individuals experience serious complications and subsequent failure with these implants. Complications from metal-on-metal hips include cobalt-chromium toxicity, metallosis, pseudotumors, infection, loosening and implant wear, joint stiffness, and fracture. These complications cause implant failure. Implant failure requires a second surgery, known as a revision surgery. A revision surgery requires removing the failed implant(s) and replacing with a new device.

Revision surgery is more complex and risky than the index surgery because it is more invasive. Therefore, the risk of complications is greater with a revision surgery than initial surgery. The implants are more likely to loosen, migrate, and fracture since the bone and hip joint are severely manipulated from the previous implant.

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